Back to articles
Articles
Volume: 28 | Article ID: art00013
Image
Individual differences in lifetime face exposure predict behavioral and neural responses to faces
  DOI :  10.2352/ISSN.2470-1173.2016.16.HVEI-116  Published OnlineFebruary 2016
Abstract

Face recognition abilities are impacted by exposure to faces belonging to distinct categories over the lifespan. Specifically, biased exposure to faces of particular races and ages frequently leads to impaired face memory and discrimination such that faces observers do not frequently see are substantially more difficult to process effectively than faces that are closer to their typical visual experience. Here, we considered the possibility that variation in the sheer amount of faces participants see during the course of their development may also systematically impact face processing. That is, if you grow up seeing a limited set of faces, are you generally less able to process faces effectively? To examine this question, we recruited participants who grew up in very small communities and compared their behavioral and neural responses to face and object images to the responses made by participants from larger communities. We find that observers with limited face exposure do show poorer face memory and also neural responses consistent with limited face-specific processing.

Subject Areas :
Views 8
Downloads 0
 articleview.views 8
 articleview.downloads 0
  Cite this article 

Benjamin Balas, Corey Grant, "Individual differences in lifetime face exposure predict behavioral and neural responses to facesin Proc. IS&T Int’l. Symp. on Electronic Imaging: Human Vision and Electronic Imaging,  2016,  https://doi.org/10.2352/ISSN.2470-1173.2016.16.HVEI-116

 Copy citation
  Copyright statement 
Copyright © Society for Imaging Science and Technology 2016
72010604
Electronic Imaging
2470-1173
Society for Imaging Science and Technology
7003 Kilworth Lane, Springfield, VA 22151 USA