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Volume: 16 | Article ID: art00032
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Digital Archiving Technologies, Practices and Ethical Guidelines in Crowd-sourced and Community-based Efforts in Culturally Endangered Societies
  DOI :  10.2352/issn.2168-3204.2019.1.0.32  Published OnlineMay 2019
Abstract

The inclusion of citizens as part of the cultural heritage community is a recipe full of promise (with a pinch of peril). In an era in which technology allows for lay people with very little training to collect immense amounts of in-the-field data pertinent to cultural heritage archiving, it behooves institutions to actively encourage and mature such activation by enthusiastically instructing and guiding this large and varied segment of the community through best practices. Although using data from individuals with little to no working knowledge of the intricacies of digital preservation is not feasible, it is equally unreasonable to dismiss such a massive and equipped population as completely unworthy. The Arc/k Project's work in conjunction with citizens and communities across the globe demonstrates that a middle ground can achieve verifiable results with limited resources and in areas that are most in need of preservation.

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Brian Pope, Scott Purdy, Michael Conyers, "Digital Archiving Technologies, Practices and Ethical Guidelines in Crowd-sourced and Community-based Efforts in Culturally Endangered Societiesin Proc. IS&T Archiving 2019,  2019,  pp 138 - 141,  https://doi.org/10.2352/issn.2168-3204.2019.1.0.32

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Copyright © Society for Imaging Science and Technology 2019
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